Category: Education

  • Building a training satellite during an internship

    Nadine Duursma is a double master’s student in Robotics and Space engineering at Delft in the Netherlands. For four months, she was a trainee at Andøya Space Education, developing a satellite training platform.

    A girl is standing up, holding a square CubeSat in her hands.
    Photo: Andøya Space Education

    The internship was not the first time Nadine visited Andøy. Five years ago, in 2019 she was one of the 24 participants in the Fly a Rocket! student rocket program through the European Space Agency. 

    – I knew about this place already, and when I saw they had an internship vacancy open, as I had come to love Norway, this would be a very nice opportunity for me. I applied and was very lucky to get the job, says Nadine Duursma smiling widely.

    Developing a satellite for training purposes

    Nadine set out to develop a CubeSat loosely based on the CanSat learning platform. The finished CubeSat will be used in a student satellite training program often referred to as AIT (Assembly, Integration and Testing). 

    – Nadine’s internship is part of an ongoing national project where Andøya Space Education works closely in collaboration with academia, industry, and other partners to offer activities for university students, explains Jøran Grande, president of Andøya Space Education.

    The CubeSat works just like a regular satellite with onboard sensors and communication systems, just not one that would work in orbit. It will be just for training and educational purposes. 

    Her new satellite measuring 10 cm x 10 cm x 10cm will be used to practice and perform AIT and cleaning procedures in a clean room

    A close-up of a girl holding a square Cube-Sat.

    – You need to have very thorough cleaning procedures when working on space equipment. First, you remove all the big particles, and then all the small particles. It is important to clean equipment that will be sent into space, as dust and humidity can damage instruments, Nadine tells us while holding the CubeSat in her hands.

    – Nadine’s work has improved several parts of the hands-on activities within our AIT program offered to university students, says Grande.

    Training programs like this are very valuable and points directly to operations at a spaceport. It gives students real experience before they dive into their space careers.

    In addition to building a satellite platform, she also spent time improving a ground station for receiving data from balloons and real satellites. She worked closely with our team and can show for great results.

    Enjoying life at Andøy

    – We focused on trying to integrate and show Nadine all the possibilities and things to do outside work by living far in the North at Andøya. This might turn out to be a small contribution to Andøya Municipality in attracting young professionals to come to live and work at Andøya where there currently are so many opportunities within the Space domain, says Grande.

    A girl stading in front of a climbing wall.

    – Coming to Andøy, leviandoy.no was helpful to me. Through it, I discovered many potential experiences, such as climbing, hiking, ice baths, biking, and ski lodging. I also did geocaching, watched the northern lights, and spotted whales. As my time here is coming to an end, I still haven’t done everything I wanted to do, like pottery class and diving, Nadine tells us. – The pace of life is more relaxing here. One day you go biking, one day you go hiking and one day you go climbing. Perhaps it’s just that freedom. I felt I had time to enjoy my stay, compared to living in a big city where people hurry, and life is more stressful. 

    A future space career

    – Now that my time in Norway is up, I will go home to the Netherlands. But not for long, as I will travel to Houston to attend a summer program at NASA, Duursma says excitedly.

    It is not Nadine’s first time in the US. She spent half a year at Princeton University earlier in her master’s program. She has also spent time in Australia as part of a larger student team that built a solar car and travelled an impressive 3000 km with it!

    At the end of Nadine’s internship, she gave a presentation to her colleagues about the work that she had focused on during the four months at Andøya Space Education. She not only delivered an excellent presentation of the work she had accomplished, but she even gave the presentation in Norwegian! 

    – I think I like the aspect of space, that you’re doing something that seemed impossible in the past. Like launching a rocket to the moon and now maybe launching a rocket to Mars. The aspect of exceeding boundaries is very appealing to me, says Duursma at the end of the interview when talking about why she would like a future space career.

    A girl sitting on the top of a mountain with view to the mountain and open ocean.
    Nadine up at the mountain Måtind at Andøya. Photo: Nadine Duursma

    Follow our career page for future possibilities.

  • Lag en satellitt – konkurranse for barn opp til 13 år

    Lag en satellitt – konkurranse for barn opp til 13 år

    Vi elsker satellitter, sånn skikkelig mye. Hva skal din satellitt løse for jorda? Skal den finne ut noe? Hjelpe oss på jorda å lage noe nytt? Gjett om vi gleder oss til å se din!

    Andøya Space har en utfordring til deg: Lag en satellitt, enten alene, med en venn eller i barnehage-/skolegruppen! Dere kan lage den akkurat slik dere vil, av hva dere vil. Gi den en oppgave som dere tror er nyttig for oss mennesker eller planeten vår. Satellitten kan males, tegnes, bygges eller til og med lages som en 3D-modell. Alle bidrag premieres.

    Hva er egentlig en satellitt?

    En satellitt er noe som går i en sirkel rundt noe annet, eller i bane som vi kaller det. Tenk på månen, for eksempel. Månen er en naturlig satellitt som går i bane rundt jorden. Den kom hit av seg selv. Men så har vi også kunstige satellitter, som den Internasjonale Romstasjonen. Den er kunstig fordi mennesker bygde den og sendte den ut i rommet for å gå i bane rundt jorden. 

    Den 2. november 2023 kommer H.K.H. Kronprins Haakon for å åpne Europas første romhavn, og tenk det – den ligger på Andøya i Vesterålen. Kanskje får han se din satellitt og vite hva den skal hjelpe oss med?

    Men hva er en romhavn?

    Du kjenner sikkert til en vanlig båthavn, eller en lufthavn for fly, ikke sant? Vel, en romhavn er omtrent det samme, bortsett fra at i stedet for båter som går og fly som tar av, så fyker raketter mot verdensrommet. Om bord er det satellitter som skal på oppdrag rundt jorden.

    Tips og idéer til konkurransen  

    • Fortell historien om din satellitt og hvordan den kan løse noe som kan gjøre framtida bedre på jorda.  
    • Satellitt kan for eksempel gi oss bedre internett og kommunikasjon, gi oss bedre værmeldinger, følge med på trafikk på land i havet og i lufta, sjekke tilstanden til planeten vår, fortelle oss hvor vi er (posisjon). 
    • Bygg satellitten av ting som vanligvis kastes i søpla: pappesker, Pringles bokser, dorullkjerner eller aluminiumsfolie! Det er miljøvennlig å gjenbruke ting som skal kastes. 
    • Se noen satellitter som allerede er i bane her: https://www.esa.int/ESA/Our_Missions

    Slik blir du med i konkurransen

    Bilder eller video (maks 30 sek) og en kort forklaring av hva satellitten gjør og heter, sendes til oss på e-post: konkurranse.education@andoyaspace.no innen 23. oktober.  Husk å ta med navn og adresse sånn at vi kan sende deg en premie!

  • The NIFRO award 2024

    Are you a university student and working on a space related master thesis? Now you have the chance to compete for the prestigious NIFRO award 2024.

    The Norwegian Industrial Forum for Space Activities, NIFRO, is a Norwegian industry organization formed to promote the interest and growth of the Norwegian space industry. Its members represent a broad range of companies in the Norwegian space industry.

    The NIFRO award is a yearly award for the best space related master thesis. The goal is to strengthen the cooperation between Norwegian space industry and Norwegian academia.

    A jury will select the winning master thesis based on several criteria. The thesis must demonstrate reflection, maturity, and analytical ability, it must have a value for Norwegian space industry, and the student must have the ability to view the thesis in a broader context.

    The award is 20.000 NOK, and the winner will be presented at the annual NIFRO Space Dinner in Oslo.

    How to submit your thesis

    In order to be nominated, you must meet the following criteria:

    • The thesis must either have been submitted to a Norwegian university, or by a Norwegian student at a foreign university, and be related to space technology or the space industry.
    • The thesis must have been submitted and judged between September 2022 and September 2023.
    • The thesis must be submitted with a 250-word executive summary.
    • It must have been written in either Norwegian or English.
    • The nomination form must be filled out correctly and submitted within the deadline.
    • The nomination must be supported by a professor, who has either guided or judged the master thesis, or by a NIFRO member representative. The support is shown by a signature in the nomination form.

    Submit your nomination by e-mail to joran.grande@andoyaspace.no before November 15th, 2023.

    The nomination must include the following documents:

    • The NIFRO award nomination form (PDF/Word)
    • The master thesis (PDF or Word-format)
    • Optional: You may also include the censor’s assessment if you so wish

    More information?

    Questions about the price can be directed towards Andøya Space Education.

  • Nominasjonen for beste masteroppgave er i gang

    Nå kan du stikke av med en prestisjepris for beste masteroppgave innen romvirksomhet og romteknologi.

    Norsk industriforum for romvirksomhet (NIFRO) deler årlig ut en pris for den beste masteroppgaven innen romvirksomhet og romteknologi. Nå har de åpnet opp for å ta imot nominasjoner.

    NIFRO-prisen har flere hensikter, men først og fremst forsøkes det å motivere og oppmuntre masterstudenter til å skrive gode oppgaver om romvirksomhet og romteknologi, med relevans for norsk romnæring.

    Utover dette som hensikt, har prisen følgende formål:

    • Styrke og formalisere samarbeidet mellom norsk romrelatert industri og utdanningssystem
    • Bidra til nødvendig og økt rekruttering til norsk romvirksomhet
    • Øke forståelsen for nytten av romvirksomhet som markedsskaper og innovasjonsskaper

    Tidligere vinnere

    Prisen har vært delt ut siden 2013, og de siste årene har følgende studenter blitt kåret som vinnere:

    • 2022: Rannveig Marie Færgestad fra NTNU modellerte og simulerte i sin oppgave om romsøppel støt i ekstreme hastigheter mot beskyttelsesskjold for romfartøy.
    • 2021: Ole Martin Borge fra NTNU utviklet i sin oppgave matematiske modeller som vil gjøre det lettere for satellitter å spore plankton i havet.
    • 2020: Dordije Bošković fra NTNU skrev oppgaven «Hardware implementation of a target detection algorithm for hyperspectral images».
    • 2019: Lars Henrik Berg-Jensen og Adrian Tofting fra NTNU skrev oppgaven masteroppgaven, «A Big Data Approach to Generate Training Data for Automatic Ship Detection».

    Kriterier til oppgaven for å bli nominert

    For at en students masteroppgave skal kunne nomineres til NIFRO-prisen 2024, må følgende kriterier må bli møtt:

    • Oppgaven må være levert ved et norsk universitet eller av en norsk student ved et utenlandsk universitet og omhandle romvirksomhet eller romteknologi.
    • Oppgaven skal ha vært levert og bedømt mellom september 2022 til september 2023.
    • Oppgaven må leveres med et sammendrag på 250 ord.
    • Oppgaven skal være skrevet på norsk eller engelsk.
    • Nominasjonsskjema må fylles ut korrekt og returneres innen søknadsfristen.
    • Kandidatens nominasjon må være støttet av en professor som har veiledet eller bedømt mastergraden eller en representant for et NIFRO-medlem. Støtte utvises i form av en signatur av nominasjonsskjemaet.

    I tillegg vil kandidater blir bedømt på følgende kriterier:

    • Utvist forståelse, refleksjon, modenhet og analytisk evne.
    • Evne til å se oppgaven i overordnede systemsammenhenger.
    • Nytteverdi for norsk romnæring.

    Nominasjoner sendes på epost til joran.grande@andoyaspace.no innen 15. november 2023, og vinneren vil få prisen utdelt under Space Dinner 2024, romindustriens årskonferanse.

    Følgende dokumenter skal sendes inn:

    • Nominasjonsskjema for NIFRO-prisen (PDF/Word)
    • Masteroppgaven i PDF- eller Word-format

    De som ønsker kan også legge ved sensors vurdering.

    Trenger du mer informasjon?

    Spørsmål om prisen kan rettes til Andøya Space Education.

  • Space Technology at NTNU: From plant research to building rockets at Andøya

    Over the last three decades, Space Technology at NTNU has covered topics from plant research for the international space station, to building and launching rockets at Andøya Space. Every year a group of students get to travel to Andøya to launch a student rocket.

    On June 11th 2023, 18 students travelled from Trondheim to Andøya to work on a rocket project for a week, and ensure the launch of their rocket.

    The story behind Space Technology at NTNU

    Nearly 30 years ago, in 1995, Professor Tor-Henning Iversen established what is now known as the Plant Biocentre at NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) in Dragvoll. Iversen and his team conducted research on plants and how they could thrive in artificial atmospheres, such as those found on the International Space Station.

    Around the turn of the millennium, Professor Iversen introduced the subject of Space Technology as part of the centre. However, after a few years, it was transferred to the Department of Physics. The subject was subsequently transferred to the Department of Electronics and Telecommunications (as it was known at the time), and Professor Vendela Maria Paxal took over.

    A longstanding tradition of fieldwork on Andøya

    When Paxal took over in 2009, the course already included a well-established field trip to Andøya. Since then, Paxal has once a year traveled to Andøya with a group of students who spend a week building the payload for a four-meter-long rocket. At the end of the week, they all have different roles in the countdown and ensure the successful launch of the rocket.

    – This opportunity I’ve had is a once-in-a-lifetime experience, said Knut Olav Kragh enthusiastically, who were one of the students in this year’s field trip.

    Space Technology II students and their rocket “Toothless”. Photo: Andøya Space Education

    Over the years, Space Technology has grown in popularity, now consisting of two courses: Space Technology I (fall) and Space Technology II (spring).

    When Paxal took over, there were around 30–40 enrolled students, but today the number is close to 200 and continues to rise. The courses cover various fields, ranging from physics, with subjects like orbital mechanics, space environment, auroras, atmospheric physics, to applications, with subjects like earth observation, navigation, communication, and astronomical observation. They also cover life in space, like effects on living organisms such as plants and humans, and technology, where the subjects cover satellite platforms, rocket technology, satellite launches, and small sats / new space.

    Importance of first-hand industry exposure

    The subject maintains strong ties with the industry, inviting guest lecturers from diverse fields. Paxal herself is also connected to the industry, working for WideNorth on the development of satellite communication equipment.

    – The feedback from both Norwegian and international students shows their great appreciation for guest lecturers, obtaining information directly from experts, and gaining firsthand knowledge of industry and research within this exciting and growing field, says Paxal.

    The highlight of Space Technology II is the opportunity to travel to Andøya Space, limited to 24 students. To enroll in this course, students must have successfully completed Space Technology I. In addition to the field trip to Andøya, students are also required to write an essay on a topic related to space technology.

    – I believe Space Technology II is an incredibly enriching course that provides us with practical experience and showcases the possibilities within the field of space technology, says Anja Våge Burtonwood, a student in the program.

    – The entire Space Technology II course raises awareness of the opportunities available in both Norwegian and European space exploration, explains Ulrik Falk-Petersen, one of the students. – I believe this field trip allows us to turn concepts into reality through a scientific rocket project, concludes Falk-Petersen.

    Anja Våge Burtonwood signing the rocket before launch. Photo: Andøya Space Education

    Jump into more opportunities for students

  • Bevilgning til Norwegian Space Academy

    Onsdag 7. juni gikk startskuddet for arbeidet med å etablere et universitetssamarbeid knyttet til den norske romhavnen som bygges av Andøya Space. Det skal skje gjennom et treårig prosjekt med navnet «Norwegian Space Academy», der målet i samarbeid med akademia og romnæringen er å etablere et attraktivt og komplementært tilbud for universiteter i Norge og Europa i framtiden

    Stortinget har i en egen merknad til Regjeringen pekt på viktigheten av å tilrettelegge for utvikling av spennende undervisningsprogrammer for universitetssektoren knyttet til den norske romhavnen som nå bygges på Andøya. Dette som et viktig bidrag for å sikre framtidige medarbeidere innen romvirksomhet som norsk industri har behov for.

    Dette er blant annet bakgrunnen for initiativet til et treårig hovedprosjekt for å etablere et universitetssamarbeid knyttet til Andøya Space, «Norwegian Space Academy». Kostnadene for det treårige hovedprosjektet er på 6 millioner kroner.

    Under et besøk på Andøya Space i dag, onsdag 7. juni, kunngjorde fylkesrådsleder Elin Dahlseng Eide at fylkesrådet i Nordland bevilger 2,9 millioner kroner til prosjektet. Fra før har Andøy kommune gjennom omstillingsorganisasjonen SAMSKAP gjort tilsvarende bevilgning, samt at Kunnskapsdepartementet bidrar med 200 000 kroner til dette arbeidet.

    – Dette er svært gode nyheter og betyr at vi nå i samarbeid med akademia og romnæringen kan starte arbeidet med å etablere et spennende universitetssamarbeid knyttet til romhavnen, sier Anne Margrethe Horsrud, daglig leder i Andøya Space Education.

    – Målet er at «Norwegian Space Academy» skal være et attraktivt og komplementært tilbud for universiteter i Norge og Europa i framtiden, avslutter Jøran Grande, prosjektleder i Andøya Space Education.

    Fylkesrådsleder Elin Dahlseng Eide og prosjektleder ved Andøya Space Jøran Grande

    Om Andøya Space Education

    Andøya Space Education er et datterselskap av Andøya Space og representerer utdanningsdelen av konsernet. Andøya Space Education driver med romrelatert undervisning for alle målgrupper; fra barnehagebarn og skoleelever til lærere og universitetsstudenter, og har som mål å utdanne og inspirere den neste generasjonen med forskere, ingeniører og utforskere over hele verden.

    Mer informasjon?

    Kontakt prosjektleder Jøran Grande for mer informasjon om Norwegian Space Academy

  • Norwegian Space Academy

    ​​Today work began to establish a new cooperation between Norwegian and European universities based on the possibilities opened by the new European spaceport under construction at Andøya Space. The cooperation is a three-year project with the name “Norwegian Space Academy” with the goal of establishing an attractive and complementary program for universities in Norway and Europe.​

    The Norwegian parliament have pointed to the importance of facilitating for new space education programs in relation to the new spaceport under construction at Andøya. This as a part of educating the future workers of Norway’s space industry. That is the background for the 6 MNOK, three-year project.  

    Today, during her visit to Andøya Space, the leader of Nordland County Council Elin Dahlseng Eide, announced that the Nordland County Council grants 2.9 MNOK to the project. This comes on top of previous grants from Andøya Municipality and the Ministry of Education and Research. 

    – This is good news, and means that we can, together with academia and the space industry, start the work of establishing the new cooperation, says Anne Margrethe Horsrud, president of Andøya Space Education.  

    – Our goal is that the Norwegian Space Academy shall be an attractive and complementary program for Norwegian and European universities in the future, says Jøran Grande, project manager at Andøya Space Education. 

    Fylkesrådsleder Elin Dahlseng Eide og prosjektleder ved Andøya Space Jøran Grande

    About Andøya Space Education

    Andøya Space Education is a fully owned subsidiary and represents the educational part of Andøya Space. Andøya Space Education provides courses, seminars and activities within space-related subjects for kindergartens, schools and universities, and aims to inspire and educate the next generation of scientists, engineers and explorers from all over the world.

    More information

    Please contact project manager Jøran Grande

  • Norwegian Cansat competition 2023

    This April, Norwegian high school students met at Andøya Space to take part in the Norwegian Cansat competition 2023.

    A Cansat is a miniature satellite small enough to fit inside a soda can. It has a primary mission to measure air temperature and air pressure, and a secondary mission which the students are free to define themselves.

    Students have to create solutions and designs which must survive being dropped from a drone while performing their missions.

    – We use the Cansat concept actively with high schools all over Norway, says Simen Bergvik, science teacher at Andøya Space Education. – It is both an interdisciplinary project teachers can do at their school, and also a yearly national competition.

    This year, four high schools participated in the competition, forming seven teams in total:

    • Norges Realfagsungdomsskole (NRG-U)
    • Rælingen high school
    • Bodin high school
    • Ølen high school

    A jury selected the winning team based on the teams’ reports, oral presentations and how they used creativity and collaboration to solve their mission.

    The Norwegian Cansat champions of 2023 is “Team Terra” from Rælingen high school. The winning team received 10 000 NOK, and gets to represent Norway in the European competition in June.

    -It has been a fun and educational experience, says Oliver Merli from Team Terra. -I’ve learned countless new skills which I’ll bring with me further on in life.

    The Cansat competitions is a collaboration between Andøya Space, Andøya Space Education, ESERO Norway and ESA Education.

    More information

    Please contact Andøya Space Education for questions regarding our services.

  • Nasjonal konkurranse i CanSat 2023

    Den 26.–28. april konkurrerte skoleelever fra hele landet om å bli nasjonal vinner i en minisatellittkonkurranse arrangert av Andøya Space og ESA Education.

    CanSat er et lærerikt tverrfaglig skoleprosjekt fra ESERO Norway (European Space Education Resource Office), ESA Education og Andøya Space Education. Elever fra hele Europa blir utfordret til å bygge en minisatellitt som skal gjennomføre et vitenskapelig oppdrag og samtidig få plass i en brusboks.

    Gjennom arbeid med prosjektet får elevene utforsket teknologi og komme fram til egne løsninger som ingen har gjort før. En ekstraordinær læringserfaring en sjeldent finner i ungdom- og videregående skole.

    – Andøya Space Education bruker CanSat aktivt i sine aktiviteter med skoleklasser fra hele landet, forteller Simen Bergvik, arrangør ved Andøya Space. I tillegg til å være et tverrfaglig skoleprosjekt som lærere kan ta i bruk på sin skole, arrangeres det også denne årlige nasjonale konkurransen mellom påmeldte lag.

    Nye ferdigheter

    Minisatellittene til elevene ble løftet opp til 120 meter med en drone i Skarsteinsdalen, et lite stykke unna Andøya Space.

    Drone med slippmekanisme montert under på vei ned fra et CanSat-slipp i Skarsteinsdalen.

    – Det har vært en kjempegøy opplevelse og lærerikt, sier Oliver Merli begeistret, elev ved Rælingen videregående skole. – Jeg har lært utallige nye ferdigheter og håper at alle timene som har gått med til arbeidet lønner seg. Jeg kommer til å ta det med videre i livet, avslutter Merli som var med på laget Team Terra.

    En CanSat inneholder mange av de samme undersystemer som en ekte satellitt har, som strømforsyning, ulike sensorer og radiokommunikasjon. Forskjellen på en satellitt og en CanSat er at sistnevnte ikke vil gå i bane rundt jorda.

    ESERO Norway driftes av Andøya Space Education på vegne av den europeiske romorganisasjonen ESA. ESERO Norway setter opp og tilbyr etterutdanning, romfartsbaserte aktiviteter og prosjekter som er spennende og givende for både elever og lærere.

     – CanSat har vært et veldig spennende prosjekt å jobbe med, forteller en ivrig Stina Tveita, elev ved Ølen videregående skole. – Jeg har lært utrolig mye og føler meg skikkelig heldig som har fått oppleve muligheten å få komme til Andøya Space, sier Tveita som var på laget Team CO2.

    Team CO2 Ølen videregående skole. Stina Tveita til høyre.

    Utfordrende for juryen

    I år var det fire videregående skoler med i konkurransen: Norges Realfagsungdomsskole (NRG-U), Rælingen videregående skole, Bodin videregående skole og Ølen videregående skole. Til sammen deltok de med syv lag.

    Juryen hadde en svært vanskelig oppgave da det var mange spennende og gode prosjekter.

    Det var likevel et lag som leverte spesielt sterkt innenfor hvert av vurderingskriteriene. De hadde en spennende vitenskapelig innfallsvinkel, og var innovative og kreative i måten de løste oppdraget på. Laget viste gode samarbeidsevner samtidig som hver av deltagerne fikk brukt sin spisskompetanse til det beste for laget.

    Elevene leverte en detaljert og god rapport før konkurransen og holdt en glimrende muntlig presentasjon av sitt prosjekt. De håndterte utfordringer underveis i prosjektet på en fremragende måte og viste gode tilpasningsevner.

    Vinneren kåret

    Basert på juryens konklusjon ble vinneren av nasjonal CanSat-konkurranse 2023 «Team Terra» fra Rælingen Videregående skole.

    CEO Ketil Olsen, Andøya Space fikk æren av å kåre vinnerlaget, som ble premiert med 10 000,- og får representere Norge i den Europeiske konkurransen 26.–30. juni i år. Der vil de møte og konkurrere med lag fra hele Europa.

    – Å være med på CanSat-konkurranse er rett og slett et minne for livet, avslutter en engasjert Bergvik.

    Team Terra fra Rælingen videregående skole viser frem sin CanSat.

    More information

    Please contact Andøya Space Education for questions regarding our services.

  • Framsat-1 shake test

    Ref: https://andoyaspace.no/articles/framsat-1-shake-test-at-andoya-space

    Before a satellite is ready for launch it is thoroughly tested to make sure it can withstand both the rocket’s intense shaking and vibrations during launch, as well as the harsh environment of space.

    The first satellites to be launched from Andøya Spaceport will be several CubeSats from five institutions in Germany, Slovenia and Norway. These nanosatellites, measuring only 10 x 10 x 10 centimeters and weighing less than two kilos each, will be launched from Andøya Spaceport by Isar Aerospace’s rocket “Spectrum”.

    One of these CubeSats is FramSat-1, built by members of the student organization Orbit NTNU at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

    FramSat-1 will test an experimental sun sensor developed for satellites and sounding rockets. Such sensors measure the sun’s position relative to the satellite, to determine the satellite’s attitude in space

    The sun sensor on FramSat-1 has been delivered by the Norwegian space company Eidsvoll Electronics (EIDEL). Other organizations which contribute to the FramSat-1 mission are Andøya Space Sub-Orbital, Andøya Space Education, Institute for electronic systems at NTNU, the Norwegian Space Agency, Kongsberg Group and Inission.

    An important milestone

    Like all satellites and spacecraft, the student CubeSats must pass several tests demonstrating that they can withstand the intense shaking and vibrations during launch as well as the harsh environment of space.

    Andøya Space is the facility for FramSat-1’s shake test.

    – This is an important milestone in the development of all satellites, says Mathias Askeland, project manager for FramSat in Orbit NTNU.

    FramSat-1 was taken through vibration tests at several different frequencies to check that the results are within the specifications from Isar Aerospace. The resonance frequency of the satellite will also be detected.

    – In addition, we will test functionality at every axis to ensure that all subsystems onboard still work as intended, says Askeland.

    Making connections with the space industry

    – Everyone working on FramSat-1 have made a maximum effort these last months. We are very relieved that the satellite is ready and that we have solved all the challenges which arose during development, Askeland says.

    After the shake test at Andøya, the three students participating in the test will bring FramSat-1 with them back to Trondheim.

    The students at Orbit NTNU are developing another satellite identical to FramSat-1, to be launched later.

    – It’s been a pleasure to work with our FramSat-1 partners and develop strong connections with the Norwegian and international space industry, Askeland says.

    Environmental testing at Andøya Space

    Andøya Space has developed an environmental testing facility for qualifying sounding rocket payloads.

    – Here we have equipment for performing spin-balancing, spin-deploy, bend-down and vacuum testing, in addition to the vibration table used for testing Framsat-1, says Geir Lindahl, Chief Engineer at Andøya Space Sub-Orbital.

    – With the rapid growth of the satellite market and the construction of our new launch base, we also intend to adapt our test facilities to be able to support more satellite customers, says Lindahl.

    Space Education 2.0

    Framsat-1 is a pilot project in Space Education 2.0, an initiative which aims to use the new educational possibilities which have opened due to the creation of Andøya Spaceport.

    – We aim to increase the utilization of the infrastructure here at Andøya Space for both Norwegian and international universities, says Jøran Grande, project manager at Andøya Space Education.

    This infrastructure includes the new launch facilities for small satellites, as well as the launch base for sounding rockets, Alomar – a laboratory for atmospheric science at Andøya Space.

    More information

  • Gaining satellite insight through FlatSat

    Ref: https://andoyaspace.no/articles/gaining-satellite-insight-through-flatsat

    In January, Kongsberg NanoAvionics, demonstrated the FlatSat concept to Andøya Space, University of Oslo (UiO) and the Arctic University of Norway (UiT). The goal is to give students the opportunity to gain insight into how satellites work.

    A FlatSat is a twin satellite, a copy of a real-life satellite. The FlatSat consists of the same subsystems as a real satellite, but instead of being assembled as a CubeSat ready for orbit, the satellite components are spread out and mounted onto a table for easy access and display.

    During the operator training employees from Andøya Space, the University of Oslo (UiO) and the Arctic University of Norway (UiT) learned how small satellites from Kongsberg NanoAvionics work, and how to access and change satellite subsystems.

    Ahead of the training, Andøya Space purchased a FlatSat from Kongsberg NanoAvionics, a small satellite constellation manufacturer and mission service provider, and installed it in a clean room. A clean room makes it possible for students and employees to work with the satellite in an environment safe from electrostatic discharges.

    – Having a working satellite made available for students, makes it a lot easier to complete practical exercises and training, says Jøran Grande, Project Manager at Andøya Space Education. – The FlatSat provides the students with a real case and gives them an impression of what it’s like to work as a professional satellite operator or a satellite engineer. With this setup, the students can also simulate a passing satellite and run simulations on the satellite’s systems and payloads.

    The training is a part of the Space Education 2.0 project, which is looking at how the new spaceport at Andøya can open new opportunities for higher education in Norway and Europe.

    – It is a unique opportunity for our students to get to work with real satellites in this way, says Ketil Hansen, Laboratory Engineer at the Department for Electronics and Space Technology, UiT Campus Narvik.

    – I certainly see good training opportunities for our students, says Professor Ketil Røed at the Department of Physics, University of Oslo.

    – It was very interesting to get to know the FlatSat concept and gain insights into the work of a satellite provider and operator, says Anja Kohfeldt, Associate Professor at the Centre for Space Sensors and Systems, University of Oslo. – I will look into how we can integrate this into our new master’s program in Space Systems at UiO.

    In addition to being used for training purposes, FlatSats are also used commercially to conduct local testing before software changes or commands are sent to a corresponding satellite in space. They can also be used as a sandbox playground for testing and development before a satellite is placed into orbit.

    – The training session was outstanding, says Andrius Bružas, Software Field Application Engineer at Kongsberg NanoAvionics. – We had a great time participating and were impressed with the level of expertise and professionalism of the Andøya Space team. Overall, it was a great experience, and we look forward to future opportunities!

    The next step for Andøya Space Education will be to work closely with the collaborating universities, and to develop exciting new hands-on complementary activities.

    More information

    Contact project manager Jøran Grande for more information

  • Studenter fra hele landet fikk se den nye norske romhavnen

    Som en del av prosjektet Space Education 2.0, ble det i månedsskiftet oktober-november arrangert en workshop ved Andøya Space for studenter ved universiteter og høgskoler.

    Et av målene med workshopen var at studentene skulle få muligheten til å bli bedre kjent med den nye romhavnen som etableres på Andøya.

    – Som en del av programmet fikk studentene en omvisning på Andøya Space, inkludert en ekskursjon til romhavnen som bygges av Andøya Spaceport, forteller prosjektleder Jøran Grande.

    I løpet av de to dagene studentene var her ble det gode diskusjoner om hvilke muligheter den nye romhavnen kan gi til Norge som romnasjon, både for næringslivet og akademia, sier Grande.

    På workshopen var Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace, samt en rekke digitale bidrag fra Isar Aerospace, Norsk Romsenter, Eidsvoll Electronics og Kjeller Innovasjon. Studentorganisasjonene Orbit NTNU, Propulse NTNU, Portal Space og UiS Aerospace fikk også presentert sine pågående aktiviteter.

    Gruppebilde av studentgruppen med landskapet og byggeplassen for romhavnen på Nordmela i bakgrunnen
    Hele studentgruppen fikk omvisning av området til den nye romhavnen på Nordmela

    Studentorganisasjoner på flere studiesteder

    Ved en rekke studiesteder i Norge, finnes det en eller flere studentorganisasjoner som jobber med romfart. Vi tok en prat med seks studenter fra seks ulike studiesteder i landet. Noen jobber i eksisterende studentorganisasjoner, andre er i oppstarten.

    – Det er veldig bra å komme til Andøya Space. Vi har fått se fasilitetene som finnes for å skyte raketter ut i rommet. Disse ønsker vi å bruke til egne raketter vi bygger, forteller Simen Flotter Flo fra Propulse NTNU. – Det er mulig å gjøre det i andre land også, men det er jo helt klart et ønske om å skyte opp fra Andøya.

    – Miljøet i Stavanger startet opp for bare ett år siden og i dag er vi 31 medlemmer! UiS Aerospace jobber nå med en egen rakett som vi en dag ønsker å få skutt opp fra Andøya, sier Michelle Nordanger Lavik.

    Seks studenter som var med på workshop hos Andøya Space
    Fra venste: Emilius Levy, UiT Narvik, Jannik Eschler, Portal Space UiO, Michelle Nordanger Lavik, UiS Aerospace, Dabrowka Knach, UiT Tromsø, Ulrik Falk-Petersen, Orbit NTNU, Simen Flotter Flo, Propulse NTNU

    – Det å komme hit til en workshop sammen med andre studentorganisasjoner er veldig nyttig for oss som er i startgropen, forteller Dabrowka Knach fra UiT. – Å snakke med andre studenter som har jobbet med slikt lenge og se hvor listen ligger er veldig bra

    Hun og Emilius Levy fra UiT Narvik jobber sammen om å få startet opp en studentorganisasjon. De har ennå ikke noe navn, men ser for seg at det kommer snart.

    Ulrik Falk-Petersen fra Orbit NTNU forteller at de, som kjent har en satellitt som skal skytes opp til neste år fra Andøya, et godt eksempel på samarbeid mellom studiesteder og Andøya Space. De baner veien med en pionersatellitt, FRAMSat-1 som skytes opp til neste år.

    – Det var helt klart verdt å ta turen til denne workshopen. Dette kunne ikke vært gjort digitalt, det hadde rett og slett ikke fungert eller gitt oss det vi har fått ut av disse to dagene, avslutter Simen Flotter Flo.

    Er du student på ett av studiestedene i landet, utfordrer vi deg å oppsøke disse organisasjonene, eller kanskje starte en ny?

    Mer informasjon

    Ta kontakt med Jøran Grande for mer informasjon

  • Anne Horsrud new president of Andøya Space Education

    Anne Margrethe Horsrud is the new president of Andøya Space Education. She takes over after Arne Hjalmar Hanssen who has led the subsidiary for more than 20 years.

    From October 1st, Anne Margrethe Horsrud is the new president of Andøya Space Education. Anne comes from the position as principal in junior high school and has over 25 years of experience from various positions in primary, lower secondary, and junior high school, the last 16 years as principal.

    – We are very pleased that Anne is joining the Andøya Space team. She is an experienced leader with a valuable background from the school system, says Ketil Olsen, CEO of Andøya Space.

    Passionate about teaching

    Anne is excited about being a part of Andøya Space. She is passionate about teaching and help create the foundation for good learning experiences.

    – I am looking forward to new challenges at Andøya Space, where I can use my knowledge and experience in a new setting, says the new president. – Andøya Space Education is doing a very important job with space education programs and activities, and I am very excited to work with all the competent staff at Andøya.

    The former president of Andøya Space Education, Arne Hjalmar Hanssen, has led Andøya Space Education for over 20 years and is now stepping down to work in a new position as Senior Advisor for public and political affairs.

    About Andøya Space Education

    Andøya Space Education is a fully owned subsidiary and represents the educational part of Andøya Space. Andøya Space Education provides courses, seminars and activities within space-related subjects for kindergartens, schools and universities, and aims to inspire and educate the next generation of scientists, engineers and explorers from all over the world.

    More information

    Please contact Andøya Space Education

  • Med besøk av Øisteins blyant blir det en helt spesiell skoleavslutning i år for Andøyelever

    Skoleavslutningen på Andøyskolene blir i år helt spesiell. Øistein Kristiansen, kjent som Øisteins blyant skal sammen med The Whale og Andøya Space Education arrangere et tegneshow 22. og 23. juni.

    Rett før sommerferien tar The Whale og Andøya Space Education med seg Øisteins blyant ut til alle Andøyskolene. Øistein vil møte elevene, tegne sammen med dem, og dessuten avsløre navnet på hval-maskoten til The Whale.

    – Jeg har besøkt skoler flere steder i verden, og nå er det Andøyas tur, forteller Øistein Kristiansen. Det å lære å tegne, det er det viktigste av alt mener jeg. Det var den største gaven jeg fikk når jeg var liten, og for meg det største å kunne formidle videre. TV og bøker er vel og bra, men å stå foran et publikum, se ansiktsuttrykket til ungene, når jeg lærer dem å tegne, er for meg en veldig stor opplevelse. Det kommer til å bli energisk og fartsfylt, og jeg håper å gi elevene en heidundrende avslutning, avslutter Kristiansen.

    Programmet for skolebesøkene

    Onsdag 22. juni

    • 0830–0930 Andenes skole
    • 1000–1100 Bleik Montessoriskole
    • 1200–1300 Åse Montessoriskole

    Torsdag 23. juni

    • 1030–1130 Risøyhamn skole

    Øistein Kristiansen har i et samarbeidsprosjekt mellom The Whale og Andøya Space Education tegnet og satt sammen et aktivitetshefte som samme dag vil bli gitt som en gave til skoleelevene. Heftet har blitt produsert av produksjonsselskapet til Øisteins blyant, Earthtree og finansiert av Andøy kommune, Samskap, The Whale og Andøya Space Education.

    Samarbeidsprosjektet mellom The Whale og Andøya Space Education har som hensikt at Teddynauten og en hval skal hjelpe barn og unge å utforske havdypet og verdensrommet. Med på laget er Øistein Kristiansen, kjent som Øistein blyant.

    Om maskotene og Øistein

    Maskoten til Andøya Space er en jente som heter Teddynauten. Hun elsker å utforske verden og universet, men dessverre har hun litt sjøskrekk. Da er det fint å ha en bestevenn som kjenner havet og passer på henne. Maskoten til The Whale er en spermhval som bor i en undervannsgrotte utenfor Andøya, og sammen med bestevennen Teddynauten reiser de på små og store eventyr.

    Øistein Kristiansen er en populær, internasjonal tegner og TV-personlighet som har lært millioner av mennesker å tegne gjennom sine TV-programmer, bøker, filmer og apper.

    Mer informasjon

    Ta kontakt med Andøya Space Education

  • Award for master’s thesis on space debris

    Rannveig Marie Færgestad received the NIFRO award 2022 for her master’s thesis on protective shields against space debris.

    – Space debris is a growing problem, and in the years to come the issue will become even more important, explains Færgestad. This week, she received the prestigous NIFRO award, the Norwegian space industry’s annual award for the best master’s thesis on space technology and space activities.

    – For space stations; shield design and how to protect against space debris have been important knowledge for decades, the prize winner explains. – When it comes to smaller satellites it has so far not been economically beneficial to protect them against small fragments of space debris, but in the future, this is something that will be relevant for more and more satellite owners.

    Shield protection for spacecrafts

    This is where her winning thesis named “Modeling and simulations of shocks at extreme speed against spacecraft shields” comes into play. There are few laboratories offering collision testing at high enough speeds, and numerical simulations provides a far cheaper alternative.

    Using advanced numerical analysis, Færgestad has modeled damage to spacecraft when hit by debris in orbit. Such models may be a key tool in the developement and design of protective shields for spacecraft, and her hands-on thesis received praise by the jury:

    – This year’s winner of the NIFRO award, presents in her thesis a useful approach to modeling collisions, to ensure that both international and Norwegian space crafts can withstand potential collisions and contribute to a sustainable future in low earth orbit, they write in their justification.

    Strong competition

    Despite strong competition and several worthy prize winners, a unanimous jury selected the NTNU student’s thesis among the 13 theses received.

    – This award means a lot, says Færgestad. – I have known about the NIFRO award since my first semester at the university. It har been very motivating throughout my studies to know that the space industry values good assignments.

    Since 2013, the prize has been awarded annually by Andøya Space Education and the Norwegian Industrial Forum for Space Activities (NIFRO). In addition to honor and glory, the price is 20,000 NOK.

    – Andøya Space is largely responsible for me deciding to pursue a career in space, the award winner announces. She is currently writing a PhD within the same topic. – In high school, I got to participate in the European Space Camp at Andøya. It really opened my eyes to all of the possibilities that exists. I am grateful that there are so many initiatives to involve young people in the Norwegian space sector.

    The jury consisted of:

    • Jøran Grande, Andøya Space Education
    • Grunde Joheim, Kongsberg Defense & Aerospace
    • Vendela Paxal, Professor II at NTNU

    The Jury’s full justification (translated from Norwegian):

    Space debris is a growing threat to current and future low-Earth spacecraft. There will be a need to meet this threat in order to ensure future exploration of space. Here, protective shields can be a significant contributor.

    Experimental shocks at extreme speed are expensive and can only be performed in a few laboratories globally. This makes numerical simulations a key tool in developing and designing protective shields.

    The recent year’s increasing focus on sustainability also for space actors, gives a greater joint responsibility to ensure that collisions with space debris do not cause critical damage to spacecraft, and that any collision create as few new fragments as possible.

    This year’s winner of the NIFRO award presents a valuable approach to modelling collisions, to ensure that both Norwegian and international spacecrafts can withstand potential collisions and contribute to a sustainable future in low earth orbit.

    The candidate has worked on a complex task with mathematical modelling, simulation and processing of results. The thesis requires the candidate to be able to translate physical knowledge into models and comparisons of experimental data. The issues are discussed at a very advanced level.

    More information

    Read more about the NIFRO award and the nomination process.

  • Mottok pris for masteroppgave om romsøppel

    Rannveig Marie Færgestad mottok den norske NIFRO-prisen 2022 for sin masteroppgave om beskyttende skjold mot romsøppel.

    – Romsøppelproblematikken vil etter alt å dømme bare bli viktigere i årene som kommer, forteller Færgestad. Denne uken mottok hun den gjeve NIFRO-prisen, rombransjens årlige pris for beste masteroppgave innen romteknologi og romvirksomhet.

    – For romstasjoner har skjold og beskyttelse mot romsøppel vært viktig kunnskap i flere tiår, men for de mindre satellittene har det ikke vært økonomisk gunstig å beskytte mot små fragmenter av romsøppel, forklarer prisvinneren. – I fremtiden er dette noe som flere og flere satellittaktører er nødt til å ta stilling til.

    Beskyttelsesskjold for romfartøy

    Nettopp her kommer vinneroppgaven «Modellering og simulering av støt i ekstreme hastigheter mot beskyttelsesskjold for romfartøy» inn i bildet. Det er få laboratorier som tilbyr kollisjonstesting i så høye hastigheter, og numeriske simuleringer utgjør et langt rimeligere og mer reelt alternativ for mange aktører.

    Ved hjelp av avansert numerisk analyse har Færgestad modellert skader på romfartøy i møte med søppel i bane. Dette vil være et sentralt verktøy i utvikling og design av beskyttelsesskjold for romfartøy, og hun får skryt fra juryen for oppgavens nytteverdi:

    – Årets vinner av NIFRO-prisen presenterer i sin oppgave en nyttig tilnærming til modellering av kollisjoner for å sørge for at romfartøyene til internasjonale og norske romaktører tåler potensielle kollisjoner og bidrar til en bærekraftig fremtid i lav jordbane, skriver de i sin begrunnelse.

    Sylskarp konkurranse

    Til tross for sylskarp konkurranse og flere aktuelle prisvinnere, var det en enstemmig jury som pekte ut NTNU-studenten sin oppgave blant 13 innkomne masteroppgaver.

    – Tildelingen betyr absolutt mye, sier Færgestad. – Jeg har kjent til prisen siden første klasse på universitetet, og det er motiverende å vite gjennom studietiden at gode oppgaver blir verdsatt og er av interesse for romindustrien.

    Prisen har siden 2013 blitt delt ut årlig av Andøya Space Education og Norsk industriforum for romvirksomhet (NIFRO). I tillegg til heder og ære, er prisen på 20 000 kroner.

    – Andøya Space har faktisk en stor del av æren for at jeg bestemte meg for å satse på en karriere i romfartssektoren, meddeler prisvinneren, som allerede er i gang med en doktorgrad innen samme tema. – På videregående fikk jeg delta på European Space Camp, der jeg virkelig fikk åpnet øynene for alle mulighetene som fantes. Jeg er takknemlig for at det finnes så gode tilbud for å få unge involvert i romsektoren i Norge.

    Juryen har bestått av:

    • Jøran Grande, Andøya Space Education 
    • Grunde Joheim, Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace
    • Vendela Paxal, professor II ved NTNU

    Juryens begrunnelse:

    Romsøppel er en økende trussel for nåværende og fremtidige romfartøy i lav jordbane.  Det vil være behov for å møte denne trusselen for å sikre fremtidig utforskning av verdensrommet. Her kan beskyttende skjold være vesentlig bidragsyter.

    Eksperimentelle støt i ekstreme hastigheter er kostbare og kan kun gjennomføres i noen få laboratorier i verden, som gjør at numeriske simuleringer er sentrale verktøy i utvikling og design av beskyttelsesskjold.

    Et økende fokus på bærekraft for romfartsaktører de siste årene gir et større felles ansvar for å sørge for at kollisjoner med romsøppel ikke gjør kritisk skade på romfartøy og at eventuelle kollisjoner skaper færrest mulig nye fragmenter.

    Årets vinner av NIFRO-prisen presenterer i sin oppgave en nyttig tilnærming til modellering av kollisjoner for å sørge for at romfartøyene til internasjonale og norske romaktører tåler potensielle kollisjoner og bidrar til en bærekraftig fremtid i lav jordbane.

    Kandidaten har jobbet med en kompleks oppgave, med matematisk modellering, simulering og bearbeiding av resultater. Oppgaven krever at kandidaten evner å omsette fysikkunnskap til modeller og sammenligning av eksperimentelle data. Problemstillinger blir diskutert på et meget avansert nivå.

    Mer informasjon

    Les mer om NIFRO-prisen på NIFRO sine nettsider.

  • Hva med en selfie i verdensrommet?

    I samarbeid med Orbit NTNU ønsker ESERO Norway å gi lærere i hele landet en utrolig spennende og unik mulighet for skoleklasser. Nå kan du som lærer få bilde av deg og elevene dine i verdensrommet!

    Illustrasjonsbilde av hvordan SelfieSat fungerer.
    Illustrasjon: Orbit NTNU

    I juni 2022 skal amerikanske SpaceX sende opp en norsk satellitt med navnet SelfieSat. Den er utstyrt med en skjerm og en selfiestang, og har som oppdrag å ta selfies i verdensrommet.

    Vi ønsker at du som lærer tar et kult bilde med deg og elevene dine og sender inn til oss, så skal vi sørge for at den blir med ombord.

    Alle innsendinger blir med på satellittens ferd til en bane rundt jorda på 525 kilometers høyde, og de beste innsendingene får tilsendt en selfie av seg selv med jorda og stjernene i bakgrunnen. Alt du som lærer behøver å gjøre er å ta et bilde av deg og dine elever og skrive noen setninger om hvorfor dere ønsker akkurat deres bilde i verdensrommet.

    Send bildet og teksten til konkurranse@esero.no før 25. februar. Merk eposten med «SelfieSat».

    Vi har også forberedt litt materiale tilknyttet SelfieSat-prosjektet, som forteller hvordan satellitten fungerer, lære om ulike satellittbaner og du kan prøve deg på å klippe og brette satellitten SelfieSat.

    For å delta i konkurransen

    Send bilde og tekst til konkurranse@esero.no før 25. februar. Vennligst merk e-posten “SelfieSat”. Lykke til.

  • Samarbeidsavtale med Høgskulen på Vestlandet

    Begge partar ser fram til å utvikle undervisning, ekskursjonar og forsking saman for å auke kunnskapen om verdsrommet både i skulen og i lærarutdanningane.

    Kva er nordlys og kvar kjem det frå? Korleis er det å vere vektlaus? Finst det romvesen?

    Lista over barn sine spørsmål om verdsrommet er uendeleg. Og bortsett frå dinosaurar, er det knapt noko tema som engasjerer elevar meir enn planetar og meteorittstormar.

    Skaparglede og utforskartrang

    På Andøya, staden der forskingsrakettar har blitt skutt opp sidan 1962, er barn og unge si interesse for verdsrommet, ivaretatt gjennom kurs, aktivitetar og ulike campar. Her blir Noreg sitt einaste operative romsenter nytta for å gi barn og unge rom til å lære, skape og utforske.

    Idar Mestad underviser naturfag for grunnskulelærarstudentane ved Høgskulen på Vestlandet, og ein av pådrivarane for samarbeidet med Andøya Space Education. Han ser fram til å bruke kunnskapen om alt frå klimaovervaking og romsøppel til rakettoppskyting og dronar i undervisninga si.

    – Deira fagkunnskap, fasilitetar, nettverk, kursing og undervisningsnettverk er til stor nytte for oss. Så langt har fire studentar ved grunnskulelærarutdanninga valt rommet som tema, og no har vi moglegheiter til å utvide dette, seier han.

    Tverrfagleg arbeid med verdsrommet

    Elise Rigstad går femte og siste året på grunnskulelærarutdanninga 1-7 og er ein av studentane som har valt verdsrommet som tema i si masteroppgåve.

    – Eg er veldig fascinert av verdsrommet, og skal undersøke korleis ein bruke verdsrommet som utgangspunktet for tverrfagleg undervisning. Å få lov til å vere med på lærarcampen på Andøya i sommar, der vi jobba tverrfagleg saman med lærarar frå heile landet, var veldig inspirerande, seier ho.

    Nasjonale og internasjonale nettverk

    Arne Hjalmar Hansen, dagleg leiar ved Andøya Space Education, besøkte Høgskulen på Vestlandet, campus Bergen, under signeringa av samarbeidsavtalen sist veke.

    – Høgskulen på Vestlandet er ein viktig bidragsytar til å fylle skulen med kompetente lærarar. Vi ser fram å kunne bidra med spannande aktivitetar som gir elevar og lærarar kunnskap om verdsrommet, og interesse for ein norsk rombransje i sterk vekst, uttalte han.

    Asle Holthe, dekan ved Fakultet for lærarutdanning, kultur og idrett ved HVL, er glad for å ha fått på plass denne avtalen.

    – Som Noregs største lærarutdanningsinstitusjon er det viktig for oss å bygge samarbeid regionalt, nasjonalt og internasjonalt. Vårt samarbeid med Andøya Space Education gir også Andøy tilgang til vårt praksisfelt. Det bidreg til relevans og praksisretting som er heilt nødvendig for å gi ei god profesjonsutdanning, seier Holthe.

    Faktaboks

    Andøya Space Education, tidlegare NAROM, blei etablert i 2000 og er eit ikkje-kommersielt selskap som skal bidra til å sikre rekrutteringa til norsk romverksemd og å skape auka interesse for real- og teknologifaga.

    Andøya Space Education har samarbeidsavtalar med ei rekke institusjonar og organisasjonar, og er på den måten både eit skulelaboratorium og feltstasjon i romrelaterte fag for disse institusjonane.

    Høgskulen på Vestlandet er landets største lærarutdanningsinstitusjon med barnehagelærarutdanning, grunnskulelæreutdanningar, praktisk-pedagogisk utdanning (yrkesfag og allmennfag) og faglærarutdanningar.

    HVL tek årleg opp 550 studentar på grunnskulelærarutdanningane der naturfag kan inngå som 30 studiepoeng, 60 studiepoeng og som masterfag.

    3. desember 2021 inngjekk Høgskulen på Vestlandet ein samarbeidsavtale med Andøya Space Education. Avtalen inneber samarbeid om undervisning, ekskursjon/besøk, forsking og utvikling nasjonalt og internasjonalt.

    Ved HVL er det assisterande instituttleiar Merete Økland Sortland, førsteamanuensis Idar Mestad og førsteamanuensis Ingjald Pilskog som har vore primus motor for å få avtalen på plass.

    Foto og tekst: Mari-Louise Uldbæk Stephan / Høgskulen på Vestlandet

    Mer informasjon

    Ta kontakt med Andøya Space Education

  • Fly a rocket from the Arctic

    In October, European students took part in the Fly a Rocket! campaign at Andøya.

    All photos: ESA Education

    The Fly a Rocket! programme offers a chance to learn about rocketry for University students early in their studies. During the stay in Northern Norway they have the chance to launch their very own rocket from Andøya Space.

    – The Fly a Rocket! programme gives entry-level university students the opportunity to work on an operational launch site and experience a rocket campaign first hand. During the launch campaign the students are supported by professionals, but are in charge of their own rocket. For the students it is a great way to complement their academic education with practical experience, explains Maximilian Nürmberger, at ESA’s Education Office.

    Students participation in the "Fly a Rocket!" programme

    Fly a Rocket! 2021

    This year, 24 participating students travelled to Andøya from 17 different European countries to work together on their very own rocket. For a few days, they collaborated in groups as scientists and engineers to plan, build, test and assemble a rocket payload with a selection of scientific sensors. The payload was then integrated in a 2.7 meters long customized Mongoose rocket, made of carbon fiber.

    Illustration of the sounding rocket used for student launches
    The student sounding rocket is a customized commercially available Mongoose rocket. Credit: Andøya Space.

    During their week at Andøya Space, the students were given a guided tour of Andøya Space and a few lectures from people working in the Norwegian space industry.

    – The amazing staff helped us all along the process and tutored us and we had the most amazing co-students from all over the world. Driven people with passion is my favorite kind of people, and this week was full of these people, says Georgios Psaltakis, a participating student.

    Some of the students gathered outside of Andøya Space

    On launch day, the students were in control of the rocket operation together with personnel at Andøya Space. Working as a team, they launched their rocket named “Aurora” on Thursday, October 14th 2021.

    After the launch, the students quickly began working on the collected rocket data, analyzing what the different sensor experiments gathered during the flight 9 km into the atmosphere.

    – Last week has been a dream come true, writes Claudia Guerra, who also participated. – I spent last year wondering whether we would be able to do it and waiting for an email telling me the programme got cancelled. But that email never came and here we are after successfully launching a rocket! The campaign itself was amazing and really interesting, but what made it even better was the people I got to meet and work with. I hope we get to see each other again around Europe soon!

    Students working on the payload for the student sounding rocket

    Friends for life

    Perhaps equally important as the educational part and the rocket operation itself was the social experience for all the students. Each of them came from different places, not knowing the others in advance. They had worked with pre-course material digitally before coming to Andøya, but this week they spent long days together getting to know each other, making valuable international contacts and friends for life.

    – It was a great adventure. We did not only build a rocket and launched it, we also became really good friends and I think that is the best part. Thank you for the wonderful experience, said Viktoria Kutnohorsky, who participated in the campain.

    Ingrid Hjelle agrees: – I had the best week at Andøya Space, participating in the Fly a Rocket! campaign. Thank you Andøya Space Education, Norwegian Space Agency and ESA Education for this opportunity, and a big, big thank you to all the wonderful people I’ve met during this week. Hope we meet again!

    – Thank you to everyone, it was incredible and I won’t forget this experience, writes Jasmine Brittan, who also participated.

    Students in front of the finished payload

    Do you want to be a part of Fly a Rocket!?

    Follow ESA Education and Andøya Space Education online for opportunities that may change the course of your space career.

    More information

    Contact Andøya Space Education

  • Bygg Spaceship Aurora på Mars i Minecraft

    Som en del av World Space Week i begynnelsen av oktober blir det en byggekonkurranse i Minecraft. Vi ønsker bidrag som viser Spaceship Aurora på Mars. Resten er opp til deg.

    Konsepttegning av Spaceship Aurora.
    Artist: Atle Mæland. Grafikk fra minecraft.net

    I 1999 erklærte generalforsamlingen i de forente nasjoner (FN) en verdensromsuke for å feire bidragene fra romforskning og teknologi, som nå har blitt verdens største offentlige arrangement med fokus på verdensrommet.

    Vår naboplanet Mars er alltid i fokus i Andøya Space sitt besøkssenter, Spaceship Aurora. Derfor vil vi i anledning World Space Week utfordre deg til å lage/bygge/designe Spaceship Aurora i Minecraft nettopp på Mars. Det er helt opp til deg hvordan du vil lage det: Du bestemmer selv om du ønsker å animere noe, lage enkle scener eller landskap hvor romskipet er på Mars, eller legge på tekstures. Her kan du være så kreativ som du ønsker!

    Send inn ditt bidrag til orjan@andoyaspace.no innen 10. oktober. Merk epost med «Minecraft byggekonkurranse». Det vil bli trukket ut én vinner som kan forvente en fin premie fra butikken vår.

    Tren som en astronaut

    Den europeiske romfartsorganisasjon søkte nylig etter nye astronauter, også i Norge. Norsk Romsenter utlyste nemlig en ledig stilling som astronaut på finn.no.

    Ble du ikke med denne gangen, kommer det kanskje en ny anledning i fremtiden. I mellomtiden kan du, familien eller klassen din begynne med astronauttrening hjemme: Bruk denne uken på å trene som en astronaut, så ligger du bedre an til neste runde med astronautopptak.

    Delta i konkurransen

    Send inn ditt bidrag innen 10. oktober

  • Nominasjonen for beste masteroppgave er i gang

    Nå kan du stikke av med en prestisjepris for beste masteroppgave innen romvirksomhet og romteknologi.

    Norsk industriforum for romvirksomhet (NIFRO) deler årlig ut en pris for den beste masteroppgaven innen romvirksomhet og romteknologi. Nå har de åpnet opp for å ta imot nominasjoner.

    NIFRO-prisen har flere hensikter, men først og fremst forsøkes det å motivere og oppmuntre masterstudenter til å skrive gode oppgaver om romvirksomhet og romteknologi, med relevans for norsk romnæring.

    Utover dette som hensikt, har prisen følgende formål:

    • Styrke og formalisere samarbeidet mellom norsk romrelatert industri og utdanningssystem
    • Bidra til nødvendig og økt rekruttering til norsk romvirksomhet
    • Øke forståelsen for nytten av romvirksomhet som markedsskaper og innovasjonsskaper

    Tidligere vinnere

    Prisen har vært delt ut siden 2013, og de siste tre årene har følgende studenter blitt kåret som vinnere:

    • 2022: Rannveig Marie Færgestad fra NTNU modellerte og simulerte i sin oppgave om romsøppel støt i ekstreme hastigheter mot beskyttelsesskjold for romfartøy.
    • 2021: Ole Martin Borge fra NTNU utviklet i sin oppgave matematiske modeller som vil gjøre det lettere for satellitter å spore plankton i havet.
    • 2020: Dordije Bošković fra NTNU skrev oppgaven «Hardware implementation of a target detection algorithm for hyperspectral images».
    • 2019: Lars Henrik Berg-Jensen og Adrian Tofting fra NTNU skrev oppgaven masteroppgaven, «A Big Data Approach to Generate Training Data for Automatic Ship Detection».

    Kriterier til oppgaven for å bli nominert

    For at en students masteroppgave skal kunne nomineres til NIFRO-prisen 2023, må følgende kriterier må bli møtt:

    • Oppgaven må være levert ved et norsk universitet eller av en norsk student ved et utenlandsk universitet og omhandle romvirksomhet eller romteknologi.
    • Oppgaven skal ha vært levert og bedømt mellom september 2021 til september 2022.
    • Oppgaven må leveres med et sammendrag på 250 ord.
    • Oppgaven skal være skrevet på norsk eller engelsk.
    • Nominasjonsskjema må fylles ut korrekt og returneres innen søknadsfristen.
    • Kandidatens nominasjon må være støttet av en professor som har veiledet eller bedømt mastergraden eller en representant for et NIFRO-medlem. Støtte utvises i form av en signatur av nominasjonsskjemaet.

    I tillegg vil kanditater blir bedømt på følgende kriterier:

    • Utvist forståelse, refleksjon, modenhet og analytisk evne.
    • Evne til å se oppgaven i overordnede systemsammenhenger.
    • Nytteverdi for norsk romnæring.

    Nominasjoner sendes på epost til joran.grande@andoyaspace.no innen 30. november 2022, og vinneren vil få prisen utdelt under Space Dinner 2023, romindustriens årskonferanse.

    Følgende dokumenter skal sendes inn:

    • Nominasjonsskjema for NIFRO-prisen (PDF/Word)
    • Masteroppgaven i PDF eller Word-format

    De som ønsker kan også legge ved sensors vurdering.

    Trenger du mer informasjon?

    Spørsmål om prisen kan rettes til Andøya Space Education.

  • Dale Oen Academy besøkte Andøya Space

    Dale Oen Academy og Andøya Space Education samarbeider tett for å gi elevene i Øygarden kunnskap om verdensrommet og øke interessen for real- og teknologifagene.

    Tidligere i år besøkte lærere fra Andøya Space Dale Oen-senteret i Øygarden med undervisningsaktiviteter. Fokus var på rakettfysikk og oppskyting av raketter.

    I juni var det Dale Oen Academy sin tur til å reise til Vesterålen: Campen «En reise til et operativt romsenter» ble gjennomført på Andøya 8.–11. juni 2021 med elever og leder fra Dale Oen. Målet med campen var blant annet at de skulle få ta og føle på et ekte romsenter, og bli bedre kjent med noen av de som jobber ved Andøya Space.

    Det faglige fokuset lå på droneteknologi, og elevene fikk selv fly med droner og oppleve mestring og glede ved å kontrollere et luftfartøy. Det ble også tid til noen flotte turer, både til lands og til vanns!

    Bilde av noen elever som ligger på bakken mens noen flyr drone og tar bilde ovenfra

    Campen ble avsluttet med med en innføring i hva som trengs av utstyr for at mennesker skal kunne reise og overleve i rommet, hvilken planlegging som må gjøres i forkant av lange romreiser og hvilke forutsetninger som finnes for liv på jorda og eventuelt andre planeter. Elevene fikk også gjennomføre det virtuelle oppdraget «Reisen til Mars» i Andøya Space sitt opplevelsessenter.

    Tilbakemeldingene fra de tilreisende var overveldende, og besøket dannet et godt utgangspunkt for å styrke og utvide samarbeidet mellom Dale Oen Academy og Andøya Space Education i fremtiden.

    Mer informasjon

    Kontakt Andøya Space Education

  • A virtual space mission for students

    The educational activities at Andøya Space benefits greatly from having access to the infrastructure and people of Andøya Space. What better way to learn about space than using real equipment and talking to the professionals in the field? But not all students can travel to Andøya, especially during a pandemic.

    Andøya Space offers two online “space missions” for students in lower and upper secondary school in a project called Andøya Mission Control. These missions are performed in the students’ own classrooms over internet. A successful mission require teamwork and the ability to turn theoretical knowledge into practical solutions.

    The educational simulations are called Mission: Solar Storm (Oppdrag: Solstorm) and Mission Mars (Oppdrag: Mars). In Mission: Solar Storm, the students act as ground control and must help repair a broken satellite before a solar storm reaches Earth, damage the satellite, and endanger the astronaut in space.

    In Mission: Mars, the students are responsible for sending a rover to the red planet to search for signs of water and life. The students must work together with a mission pilot in order to program the rover for this task. After the mission, the students analyze the collected data from the Martian surface.

    Illustration of mission patch for mission mars

    Introductions for the teacher

    – As a science teacher with a personal interest in space and space exploration, I was curious to see how “Mission: Mars” would work with our students, says Stine Skarshaug at Molde Videregående Skole.

    Her students are aged 16 to 19, and she used “Mission: Mars” for her students in Technology and Research, one of the electable courses at the VG2 and VG3 level of Norwegian high school education.

    The course gives practical insight into how academia and industry make use of science and technology, and includes software coding, working with electronics, and learning about research methods.

    ­– Before introducing “Mission: Mars” to their students, the teachers attend a half-day introductory training course which explains how to use and solve the mission, Skarshaug says.

    Math, physics, and coding

    Prior to the mission, the students were divided into specialized groups which all reported back to Mission Control.

    The mission itself lasted about 70 minutes. Afterwards, the students worked with and analyzed the data from the rover, before writing their own reports from the mission covering the tasks of their group and the results.

    – We spent about four weeks overall, from preparing the mission, to solving it, and completing the report. The mission includes side tasks and the teacher can adjust the number of these to fit the schedule and progression of their course, Skarshaug says.

    The mission tasks are also adjustable according to the age of the students and their experience with math, physics, coding, geology, and other science subjects.

    – “Mission: Mars” includes a large package of preparatory material for the teacher. With this the mission can be tailored to any class and level from ages 13 and up, Skarshaug says.

    She recommends that the students have some experience with science, math and particularly software coding before embarking on the mission.

    Illustration of mission patch for mission solar storm

    A useful, flexible, and fun tool

    – Several of the students were already interested in space and space exploration, but all students enjoyed the new and different way of learning in “Mission: Mars”, says Skarshaug.

    She found it not only fun for students and teacher alike, but also a useful and flexible tool for education.

    – I highly recommend Mission: Mars to other teachers, as it can easily be adjusted to different types of classes and subjects, covers multiple goals for the Technology and Research course at VG2, and demonstrates how science and technology are used in real life, says Skarshaug.

    More information

    Contact Andøya Space Education.

  • Andøya Space contributes to Latvian innovation center

    Andøya Space Education aims to inspire children and students both in Norway and abroad through world class space education. When a space innovation center is currently being built in Latvia, it is done in collaboration with Andøya Space.

    Andøya Space Education has signed an agreement with Cēsis Municipality to contribute to the establishment of an innovation center in Latvia. Onboard is also Riga Technical University.

    The goal of the project is to promote the development of knowledge and career choices in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) by establishing an innovation center in Cēsis, Latvia, focusing on space.

    The innovation center will be based on bilateral cooperation, where educational programs, workshops, co-working places, maker-labs, and other interactive activities in the STEM area are developed for school children and students, teachers and preschool children, and their parents.

    – We are exited and inspired about this project as it will create new jobs, increase tourism and economic development in Cēsis region, as well as make STEM education innovative and more interesting, says Ilze Sestule, public relations project manager at Cēsis municipality.

    Cēsis has looked to Andøya for inspiration when developing the content of their new innovation center, as Andøya Space has been launching science rockets since 1962 and has more than two decades with space education experience.

    – We look forward to working with Cēsis Municipality in this project, says Marcos Fraga, the project lead at Andøya Space. – For us, innovating and collaborating with Cēsis aligns perfectly with our corporate values.

    The project has been funded through EEA and Norway grants organization.

    More information

    Contact Andøya Space Education.

  • Andøya Space og Viken fylkeskommune

    Andøya Space Education samarbeider med skoler over hele landet. Nå skal samarbeidet med Viken fylkeskommune styrkes.

    Bilde av fylkesråd for utdanning i Viken fylkeskommune, Siv Jacobsen og daglig leder for Andøya Space Education Arne Hjalmar Hanssen
    Fylkesråd for utdanning i Viken fylkeskommune besøke Andøya Space Education og Arne Hjalmar Hanssen

    Fylkesråden for utdanning i Viken fylkeskommune Siv Jacobsen, besøkte nylig Andøya Space. Under besøket fikk hun orientering om virksomheten på romsenteret, samt aktivitetene og tilbudene som tilbys videregående skoler rundt om i landet, – både gjennom skolebesøk på Andøya og aktiviteter ved den enkelte skole. Hun fikk også en omvisning i lærings- og opplevelsessenteret «Spaceship Aurora» som blant annet har spennende oppdrag og aktiviteter tilpasset de nye læreplanene for videregående skoler.

    – Det var med glede jeg takket ja til invitasjonen fra Andøya Space, sier fylkesråd Siv Jacobsen. – Akershus fylkeskommune har tidligere hatt en egen samarbeidsavtale med Andøya Space, og flere av de videregående skolene i Viken har samarbeidet godt med dere over flere år. Etter fylkessammenslåingen ser vi nå på hvordan samarbeidet kan utvikles videre.

    – Å bidra til undervisningstilbudet i videregående skole er en del av samfunnsoppdraget vårt fra Kunnskapsdepartementet, sier daglig leder Arne Hjalmar Hansen. – Vi er glad for å kunne videreføre samarbeidet med flere av de videregående skoler i nye Viken fylkeskommune, og ser fram til å kunne utvide dette.

    – Dette blir det spennende å følge med på, smiler Siv Jacobsen etter å ha fått høre siste nytt også om etableringen av Europas første oppskytingsbase for satellitter på Andøya. – Dette vil utvilsom løfte Norge som romnasjon og gi mange og nye spennende muligheter også på utdanningsområdet, avslutter hun.

    Mer informasjon

    Kontakt Andøya Space Education.

  • VGS-elever testet ut nettbasert læringsspill

    Samme dag som den nyeste Mars-roboten fra NASA landet på vår naboplanet testet tolv elever ved Vestby videregående skole et nytt, nettbasert læringsspill hvor formålet er nettopp å lande en robot på Mars.

    Lærer Jan Otterstad hadde i forkant kontakt med Andøya Space Education og ønsket å være med å prøve ut et helt nytt digitalt læringsprosjekt for ungdoms- og videregående skoler, «Andøya Mission Control – Oppdrag: Mars». Dette er et skoleprosjekt med fokus på mestring, teknologi, realfag, verdensrommet og koding, et tiltak for å gjøre læring konkret og inspirerende.

    Oppdrag: Mars – et digitalt rollespill

    Andøya Mission Control er et nettbasert rollespill hvor klasserommet forvandles til et kontrollsenter, og elever bemanner ulike stasjoner for å bistå en pilot fra Andøya Space i et virtuelt romoppdrag. Prosjektet består av klasseromsaktiviteter som utføres i forkant av et romoppdrag, etterfulgt av flere aktiviteter.

    Elevene må samarbeide og kommunisere godt for at oppdragene skal bli vellykket. I «Oppdrag: Mars», skal elevene forberede en rover med kodeinstrukser og sende den med Spaceship Aurora til Mars. Der skal roveren samle inn nyttig informasjon på overflaten som deretter returneres til jorden via en satellitt i bane rundt Mars. Dataene skal senere analyseres i klasserommet.

    Et skoleprosjekt som følger alle motivasjonens regler

    Marianne Ødegaard, professor ved Institutt for lærerutdanning og skoleforskning ved UiO, skrev i 2017 en artikkel hvor hun mener rollespill og refleksjon hører hjemme i naturfaget, ettersom elevene blir mer aktive når timene har en personlighets- og virkelighetsnær tematikk. Dette stemmer veldig godt overens med hvordan vi med Andøya Mission Control legger opp det pedagogiske innholdet og interaksjonen mellom oss på Andøya Space og klasserommet på skolen, ulike mindre grupper og klassen som samlet.

    Signalene ble enda tydeligere da Veronica Danielsen i en masteroppgave i fysikkdidaktikk (2020) systematisk analyserte Andøya Mission Control som læringsverktøy, og i en artikkel (2019) der hun kommer frem til at konseptet vårt følger vi alle motivasjonens regler.

    En opplevelse for alle som kommer til Andøya Space

    Mars-roboten til NASA har med seg en norsk radar kalt RIMFAX som skal se ned under overflaten på Mars.

    RIMFAX er den første norske nyttelasten som lander på Mars, og den aller første georadaren på vår naboplanet. Instrumentet skal i de neste årene styres fra Universitetet i Oslos nye Centre for Space Sensors and Systems (CENSSS) på Kjeller. Her skal dataene fra den norske georadaren analyseres og brukes i forskning.

    Dette instrumentet er med i skoleprosjektet «Andøya Mission Control – Oppdrag: Mars». Men selv om du ikke er elev på ungdomsskolen eller i videregående skole, kan du likevel få oppleve å frakte en rover til Mars. Besøkende på Andøya Space kan nemlig også være med på et slikt spennende romoppdrag. Det virtuelle oppdraget «Reisen til Mars», et tilbud i opplevelses- og besøkssenteret Spaceship Aurora ved Andøya Space inkluderer et møte med det norske instrumentet RIMFAX som nå er i drift på naboplaneten vår.

    Mer informasjon

    Kontakt Andøya Space Education.

  • New names: Andøya Space Education and Andøya Space Defence

    To clarify who we are and what we do, we are renaming the subsidiaries NAROM and Andøya Test Center (ATC). The new names Andøya Space Education and Andøya Space Defence highlights their areas of expertise and their connection to the Andøya Space brand.

    Andøya Space Education

    Andøya Space Education represents the educational part of Andøya Space. Thousands of people are every year inspired by the educational programs we offer, and our visitor center attracts both space-interested pupils as well as tourists.

    Formerly known as NAROM, Andøya Space Education was established twenty years ago to increase recruitment to science, technology and Norwegian space activities. Although the name has been changed, we will continue as a national center to inspire and educate the next generation of scientists and engineers with mandate and funding from the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research.

    Andøya Space Defence

    In 1997 a test center was established in connection to the sounding rocket launch site at Andøya. The area surrounding the island, and the already established technical infrastructure, enables Andøya Space Defence to perform complex tests of weapon systems.

    Andøya Space Defence will continue to offer a state-of-the-art civilian test range for military capabilities.

    The brand

    Andøya Space is leading in its field both when it comes to testing, drones, sounding rockets and space-related education. Our logo is a stamp of quality, and we will continue to deliver quality services within technology, testing and knowledge in many years to come.

    Mer informasjon

    Kontakt Andøya Space.