Published: 5. May 2015 by: Kolbjørn Blix Dahle

Andøya Space Center deler ut støttemidler til frivillige lag og organisasjoner for unge i Andøy kommune

På denne måten ønsker vi å bidra til å opprettholde et rikt og aktivt kulturliv i Andøy og gjøre kommunen til et attraktiv sted å bo på.

Alle som driver med aktiviteter innen kunnskapsrettede tiltak, musikk, teater og idrett for barn og unge kan søke om midler fra Andøya Space Center.

Vi gir ikke støtte til politiske partier eller aksjoner, eller aktiviteter med kommersielle formål.

Vi deler ut midler én gang pr. år, og søknadsfristen er utvidet til 1.6 2015

Vennligst benytt vårt søknadsskjema:
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Mer informasjon om ordningen fås ved henvendelse til lederen av Markedsavdelingen:
Kolbjørn Blix Dahle,
telefon 76 14 45 42, kolbjorn@andoyaspace.no

Published: 17. March 2015 by: Kolbjørn Blix Dahle

WADIS-2 rocket launched March 5, 2015 at 2:44 CET

Original article by DLR: http://www.dlr.de/dlr/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-10081/151_read-12971/#/gallery/18849

The atmosphere is a highly complex system, with interacting in effects such as sunlight, changing gas compositions, dust, ice crystals and electrical charge. They influence weather patterns and climate development. Specifically, the density changes in the Middle atmosphere is examined by the WADIS project (wave propagation and dissipation in the middle atmosphere) of the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) in Kühlungsborn with the support of the German Aerospace Center (DLR). On March 5, 2015 at 2:44 Central European Time, the sounding rocket WADIS-2 launched from Andøya Space Center with nine experiments on board into the night sky above Norway. In addition, 13 small, simple “weather rockets” named Loki-Dart, measures the pressure and temperature in the days before and after WADIS, thereby determining a larger weather environment.

The 1550 kg heavy WADIS-2 rocket reached an altitude of around 126 km. During the flight the sensors detected air pressure, temperature, electrical charges as well as density changes in the atmosphere. These changes in air density, so-called gravity waves can be measured in terms of temperature, pressure and wind fluctuations. They occur, for example, where wind currents near ground pass an obstacle, such as a mountain range, and these disorders continue to about 80 km altitude. The phenomenon of gravity waves is known, but have not yet been thoroughly explored in a wide range. However, this is an important prerequisite to improve climate models in the future.

Five experiments on board WADIS-2 were German. Three of them were from scientists at the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics: the CONE sensors (Combined Measurement of Neutrals and Electrons) for measurement of density fluctuations, a particle sensor for the determination of aerosols and a so-called falling ball (Active Falling Sphere). Falling balls were used earlier in meteorology. They were dropped at a certain height, and radar measurements from the ground determined the air density, temperature and horizontal wind speeds. These 25 centimeter and three-pound falling balls has their own measuring instruments on board, which is why they are referred to as “active”. These are 3D Accelerometers, gyros, GPS receivers and radio electronics. The ball is located between the rocket motor and the payload, and is ejected after the separation of the engine.

After about ten minutes of flight the payload unit watered in the North Atlantic, about 80 miles off the coast of Norway. There it was taken on board a salvage vessel and transported back to Andøya for further evaluation of the experiments. Already, half a year ago, on 28 June 2013, the predecessor rocket WADIS-1 was launched. That mission took place in the transitional period between spring to summer, while WADIS-2 started in the winter. From a scientific point of view, this difference is very important because then the atmosphere is in a different state. It is very easy, based these ongoing processes, to conclude on scientific grounds. With the WADIS project, the ECOMA research program was continued from September 2006 to December 2010 with the launch of nine sounding rockets.

The WADIS project is under the scientific leadership of the Leibniz Institute of Atmospheric Physics. Other partners include the University of Stuttgart and the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich. The instruments were made part of the Schwetzingen company from Hoerner & Sulger Gmbh, the “Active Falling Sphere” was developed by the IAP, the Argus Electronik GmbH and the Institute of Electrical Engineering of the University of Rostock. The Mobile Rocket Base of the German Aerospace Center (DLR-MORABA) in Oberpfaffenhofen was responsible for the implementation of the launch campaign. The project is funded by the DLR Space Administration with support from the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi).

Published: 22. January 2015 by: Kolbjørn Blix Dahle

ASC part of Memorandum of Understanding between Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and Norwegian Space Centre on Sounding Rocket Research Cooperation

The MoU between NSC and JAXA is signed.

The MoU between NSC and JAXA is signed.

January 16th ASC participated during the official signing of a new Memorandum of Understanding between Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and Norwegian Space Centre on Sounding Rocket Research Cooperation. The signing took place at the JAXA Hq in Jindaiji Higashi-machi, Chofu-shi, Tokyo.

This agreement is concluded by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Norwegian Space Centre (NSC) in order to implement the collaborative activities between the Parties on the sounding rocket experiments.

NSC will collaborate with the following organizations to execute its responsibility

  • Andøya Space Center (ASC)
  • University of Oslo (UiO)
Published: 19. November 2014 by: Kolbjørn Blix Dahle

Upcoming sounding rocket missions CAPER and C-REX from Andøya Space Center

Archive photo: NASA RENU (Rocket Experiment for Neutral Upwelling)mission (Black Brant XII) in 2010. PI was Dr Marc Lessard, University of New Hampshire Hampshire.

Archive photo: NASA RENU (Rocket Experiment for Neutral Upwelling)mission (Black Brant XII) in 2010. PI was Dr Marc Lessard, University of New Hampshire.

The CAPER mission
NASA (Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC’s) Wallops Flight Facility) and Andøya Space Center are currently gearing up for the upcoming launch of two big sounding rockets in late November, beginning of December. Dr. Jim Labelle of Dartmouth College is the Principal Investigator (PI) for the CAPER (Cusp Alfven and Plasma Electrodynamics Rocket) mission (NASA proj. 49.003 UE) , aimed at measuring the so called Alfven Waves Associated with electron acceleration. CAPER will study these wave-particle interactions at both low and high frequencies by launching the instrument payload into an active cusp region aurora. The experiment requires an Attitude Control System (ACS) to align the main payload to the earth’s magnetic field during the science Collection period of the flight. Universities collaborating on this experiment include the University of Iowa (Dr. Craig Kletzing and Dr. Scott Bounds) and the University of Oslo (prof. Jøran Moen). The experiment also includes several engineers and grad students. The CAPER mission will consist of one Oriole IV sounding rocket which is very simiar to the Black Brant XII vehicle. The launch window is between 19.11 2014 and 3.12 2014.

The C-REX mission
In parallell with the CAPER mission, NASA is also preparing the C-REX (Cusp-Region Experiment) mission (NASA nr. 52.001 UE). The PI for this Experiment is Dr. Mark Conde of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF). The C-REX Experiment is being based lined aboard a Black Brant XIIA launch vehicle and requires the deployment of 24 individual canisters sub-payloads. Each canister will be propelled away from the main payload by small rocket motors and then detonate, releasing barium and strontium  clouds between the altitude of 150 and 400 km over the Greenland Sea, west of Svalbard. Ground and aircraft based cameras will then track these clouds with the strontium drift indicating movement of the neutral winds, and the barium drift giving the ion velocities. This Experiment also requires an Attitude Control System (ACS) to hold alignment of the main payload during sub-payload deplaoyments and real time GPS release timing in order to maintain the desired integrity of the resultant constellation. The C-REX mission is a collaboration between the UAF, Clemson University (CU) with Dr. Miguel Larsen as Co-Investigator and responsible person for the barium/strontium ampoules needed for this mission, and the University College of London (UCL) with Dr. Anasuya Aruliah responsible for the UCL’s Fabry-Perot instruments on Svalbard . The C-REX launch window is between 19.11 2014 and 12.12 2014.

 

Published: 29. October 2014 by: Kolbjørn Blix Dahle

Andøya Space Center and NAROM signs renewed CaNoRock MoU in Toronto

CaNoRock MoU signing in progress at TSW2014 in Toronto.

CaNoRock MoU signing in progress at TSW2014 in Toronto. From the left: Prof. David Knudsen (U of Calgary), Prof. Ian Mann (U of Alberta), Kolbjørn Blix Dahle (signing on behalf of Andøya Space Center/NAROM), Jøran Moen (Adjunct Prof. at UNIS (signing on behalf of Ole Arve Misund, Managing Direcor of UNIS)), Rektor Anne Husebekk (U of Tromsø), Rektor Dag Rune Olsen (U of Bergen), Rektor Ole Petter Ottersen (U of Oslo) and Provst & Vice President Academic Ernie Barber (U of Saskatchewan).  Chairing the signing process, from the left: Ambassador of Norway to Canada Mona Elisabeth Brøther and Ambassador of Canada to Norway David Sproule.

 

On October 28th, Andøya Space Center (ASC) and NAROM signed a renewed CaNoRock MoU as a part of Transatlantic Science Week in Toronot, Canada.  The Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) is on the future development of the CaNoRock student training and research program. CaNoRock has been running since 2009, and was officially incepted at Andøya Space Center by the former Canadian Ambassador to Norway, Mr. John Hannaford in January 2011.

CaNoRock is a partnership between ASC, NAROM, the Norwegian universities of Oslo, Tromsø, University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS), Bergen and the Canadian universities of Calgary, Alberta and Saskatchewan, and is funded by the Norwegian Space Centre, Canadian Space Agency and the Norwegian Centre for International Cooperation in Education (SIU) .

The signing was chaired by Ambassador of Norway to Canada Mona Elisabeth Brøther and Ambassador of Canada to Norway David Sproule. The representatives from the participating institutions were: Prof. David Knudsen (U of Calgary), Prof. Ian Mann (U of Alberta), Kolbjørn Blix Dahle (signing on behalf of Andøya Space Center/NAROM), Jøran Moen (Adjunct Prof. at UNIS (signing on behalf of Ole Arve Misund, Managing Direcor of UNIS)), Rektor Anne Husebekk (U of Tromsø), Rektor Dag Rune Olsen (U of Bergen), Rektor Ole Petter Ottersen (U of Oslo) and Provst & Vice President Academic Ernie Barber (U of Saskatchewan).

CaNoRock rollups at the SiU stand at TSW2014

CaNoRock rollups at the SiU stand at TSW2014

CaNoRock
The CaNoRock program is a 10-year (2010-2020), bilateral student sounding rocket and satellite program between Canada and Norway. The program aims to motivate students to join space activities and acquire an enhanced knowledge in physics, engineering and electronics for sounding rockets (instrument-carrying rockets designed to take measurements and perform scientific experiments), miniaturized satellites (CubeSats) and stratospheric balloons.

CaNoRock was born at the Transatlantic Science Week in Ottawa in 2008. It started as a response to a call by Director General David Kendal of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) for student programs in rocket activity and signalized that they would consider to by capacity.

The Norwegian Centre for International Cooperation in Education (SIU) provided seed money for a market test amongst students at the universities of Alberta, Calgary and Saskatchewan in 2009, funding 4 student places in the student rocket program in the Universities of Oslo and Tromsø in the fall of 2009. With more than fifty applicants from Canada, this was a great success and CaNoRock I was launched. CSA and the Norwegian Space Center (NSC) then provided finding for a three year student program for 20 students on each annual rocket launch mission.

The joint activites in the CaNoRock program has resulted in more than 200 Norwegian & Canadian student exchanges.

CaNoRock STEP (2012-2016)
The Canada-Norway Rocket Science Training and Educational Program is a project under the Norwegian Partnership Program for Higher Education Collaboration with North America

The main objective of CaNoRock STEP is to establish opportunities for collaborative, research-led active training and education that build on the educational content of CaNoRock, and which enable graduate-level students to take part in joint Norway-Canada space research projects. In 2012, CaNoRock STEP received a NOK 2 mill. (CAD 340 000) grant from the Norwegian Centre for International Cooperation in Education (SIU) for a 4-year joint project between the Norwegian universities of Oslo, Bergen, Tromsø and UNIS with their Canadian partner universities of Calgary, Saskatchewan and Alberta.

STEP goals

  • 20 student exchanges for one semester (BSc/MSc/PhD) from Norway to Canada each year.
  • 20 student exchanges for one semester (BSc/MSc/PhD) from Canada to Norway each year.
  • Support for 22 weeks of staff exchange to co-supervise and plan the research education activities
  • 3 PhD Schools  x 10 PhD students
  • Develop at least one externally funded research project

During a CaNoRock side event following the MoU signing process, the following topics were up for debate amongs the partners and funding agencies:

  • Increasing the number of student exchanges
  • Establishing a CaNoSat student satellite program
  • Setting up a Joint International Space Degree


The new MOU:
The CaNoRock student rocket and exchange program, sponsored by the Norwegian Space Centre and the Canadian Space Agency is a successful student rocket program, recruiting an increasing number of students to space physics and technology.

  • It also recruits students to the mobility program CaNoRock STEP (Canada-Norway Rocket Science Training and Educational Program) to facilitate increased mobility of staff and students between the Norwegian and the Canadian partners. The aim is to establish research opportunities for graduate-level students on prioritized rocket and satellite projects in Norway and Canada.
  • CaNoRock STEP is funded until 2016 by the Norwegian Centre for International Cooperation in Education (SiU). The goal is that the Parties by that date have established a sustainable future collaborative program in research and education with the necessary external funding.
  • The signing of this MoU expresses each Party’s commitment to strive to allocate sufficient academic, administrative and technical resources to successfully complete the CaNoRock STEP partnership program.
  • The aim is to explore the following activities and areas of collaboration:                                                                                                                       
  1. Pre-approved course packages for semester exchanges at bachelor, master and PhD levels
  2. Funding at least one student rocket per year
  3. Research project opportunities for graduate-level students
  4. Annual PhD schools/ scientific workshops
  5. Setting up a joint international space degree
  6. Establishing a CaNoSat student satellite program

Transatlantic Science Week
The purpose of the annual Transatlantic Science Week (TSW) is to promote enhanced cooperation between Canadian, American and Norwegian stakeholders in research, innovation and higher education. TSW is an arena where different stakeholders can meet with the purpose of developing long-term collaborations or partnerships. The conference also hopes to strengthen the linkages that currently exist between the research and education domains. Finally, TSW also provides an excellent arena for dialogue between the research communities and policymakers.

The Royal Norwegian Embassies in Ottawa and Washington, DC are co-organizers of TSW this year. The conference is made possible by generous contributions from the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research, the Norwegian Ministry of Trade, Industry and Fisheries, the Research Council of Norway, the National Research Council Canada, and the University of Toronto.

This year’s TSW marks the13th annual conference and will focus on challenges and opportunities in the Arctic, with a special look at Arctic societies, sustainability and safety.

Published: 9. October 2014 by: Kolbjørn Blix Dahle

CaNoRock X / EuRock I launched today

CaNoRock X / EuRock I soaring to the skies above Andøya, Norway

CaNoRock X / EuRock I soaring to the skies above Andøya, Norway (Photo: Kolbjørn Blix Dahle, ASC)

After nearly a week with intense work, the students from Switzerland, France, Norway and Canada launched their sounding rocket this morning at 11:30 LT. This was the 1oth rocket within the CaNoRock program, a bilateral student rocket & exchange program between Norway and Canada. Since late 2009, over 180 students have been at Andøya Space Center building their rocket, launched it and processed data. Making new friends and learning advanced team work is also a major part of the experience.

What was so special about this particular rocket was that for the second time (CaNoRock IX in February 2014) we had two students from Switzerland. And in addition to this, even one from France! Thanks a lot to Swiss Space Office and CNES in France for making this happen!

Read more about CaNoRock!

Published: 21. August 2014 by: Kolbjørn Blix Dahle

Engasjementstilling – Romskipet Aurora

dokikon_20140210122927Vi har ledig et 2-årig engasjement i 100 % stilling som prosjektleder for Romskipet Aurora, med tiltredelse snarest mulig. Det er mulighet for at engasjementet forlenges og omgjøres til fast stilling. Personen vi søker skal i hovedsak ha ansvar for den delen av driften som berører gjester fra inn- og utland, samt kurs og konferanse.

Les mer her!

Published: 29. July 2014 by: Kolbjørn Blix Dahle

PRESSEMELDING: Stortingsrepresentant Sivert Bjørnstad besøker Andøya Space Center for å foreta åpningen av European Space Camp 2014 på fredag morgen.

Stortingsrepresentant Sivert Bjørnstad åpner European Space Camp fredag morgen på Andøya Space Center.

Stortingsrepresentant Sivert Bjørnstad åpner European Space Camp fredag morgen på Andøya Space Center.

European Space Camp er en 8 dagers internasjonal   realfagsleir for ungdom i alderen 17 – 20 år.

Realfaginteressert ungdom fra hele verden får bruke en del   av sommerferien sin til opplevelser en definitivt ikke får på skolebenken.   Deltakerne har daglige forelesninger i romrelaterte emner, samt gruppearbeid   hvor kunnskapene settes ut i praksis. Slik får deltakerne ta aktivt i bruk   unike ressurser som finnes på Andøya Space Center.

På slutten av oppholdet har European Space Camp sitt absolutte klimaks –   oppskyting av rakett som har med instrumenter deltakerne har satt sammen og   klargjort. Under leiren legges det vekt på et høyt faglig nivå, samtidig som   blant annet hvalsafari og midnattsbading også gjør campen til et svært   sosialt arrangement.

European Space Camp arrangeres av Forbundet Unge Forskere og NAROM. Andre   viktige samarbeidspartnere er Norsk Romsenter og den europeiske   romorganisasjonen European Space Agency. I år   er det 25 deltakere fra 8 nasjoner som deltar på campen.

Den offisielle åpningen skjer fredag 1. august. kl 0900   på Andøya Space Center, og det er stortingsrepresentant Sivert Bjørnstad som   foretar denne. Bjørnstad er medlem av Stortingets kirke-, undervisnings- og   forskningskomite, og representerer Fremskrittspartiet.

 

 

 

Stortingsrepresentant Sivert Bjørnstad åpner European Space Camp fredag morgen på Andøya Space Center.

Published: 23. June 2014 by: Kolbjørn Blix Dahle

Ledige stillinger ved Andøya Space Center

Det er nå ledig to stillinger ved Andøya Space Center. Les mer om stillingene her:

Published: 30. April 2014 by: Kolbjørn Blix Dahle

ALOMAR celebrates 20 years in August 2014

alomar20ALOMAR is delighted to celebrate 20 years as a unique and internationally-recognized research observatory, Sandra Blindheim says. Sandra is Director of the ALOMAR Observatory.

The celebration will consist of a mixture of engaging scientific talks and discussions, as well as social events and arctic activities for invited guests. How ever, some of the arrangements unfolding at the atmospheric observatory on the top of the mountain Ramnan, a few kilometers outside the town of Andenes in Norway will also be open for the general public. The Opening Ceremony, August 22nd is one of them.

To find out more, check out the program! ALOMAR Observatory 20 years uten ASAC

Symposium participants: Bakerst fra venstre: Ulf van Zahn (tidl. IAP), Reidar Lyngra (ASC), Ralph Latteck (IAP), Jens Fiedler (IAP), Sven Peter Näsholm (NORSAR) , Marianne Moen (NRS), Josef Höffner (IAP), Mathew Beharrell (Lancaster Uni.), David Fritts (Gats Inc), Jens Hildebrand (IAP), Michael Gausa (ASC), Malin Abrahamsen (ASC), Georg Hansen (NILU), Eivind Thrane (tidl. FFI/ASC), Ove Havnes (UiT), Bjørn Gustavsson (UiT/Eiscat), Odd Roger Enoksen (ASC) I trappen, bak fra venstre: Ida Larsen (ASC), Sandra Blindheim (ASC), Charis Jones,  Franz-Josef Lübken (IAP), Alain Hauchecorne (CNRS), Jorge Chau (IAP) Neder fra venstre: Jøran Moen (UiO), Hannes Vogelmann (KIT), daughter of Hannes, Gerd baumgarten (IAP)

Symposium participants:

Behind from the left:
Ulf van Zahn (tidl. IAP), Reidar Lyngra (ASC), Ralph Latteck (IAP), Jens Fiedler (IAP), Sven Peter Näsholm (NORSAR) , Marianne Moen (NRS), Josef Höffner (IAP), Mathew Beharrell (Lancaster Uni.), David Fritts (Gats Inc), Jens Hildebrand (IAP), Michael Gausa (ASC), Malin Abrahamsen (ASC), Georg Hansen (NILU), Eivind Thrane (tidl. FFI/ASC), Ove Havnes (UiT), Bjørn Gustavsson (UiT/Eiscat), Odd Roger Enoksen (ASC)

In the stairs, behind from the left:
Ida Larsen (ASC), Sandra Blindheim (ASC), Charis Jones, Franz-Josef Lübken (IAP), Alain Hauchecorne (CNRS), Jorge Chau (IAP)

Bottom left:
Jøran Moen (UiO), Hannes Vogelmann (KIT), daughter of Hannes, Gerd baumgarten (IAP)

 

 

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